Debut Novels for Book Clubs in 2019

 

Let us help you get the new year off to a great start by introducing you to five dynamic authors and their debut novels, all of which are recommended for book club discussion. Historical fiction aficionados should check out Rebellion by Molly Patterson, set in 19th and 20th century China, and rural America. Also, The Floating World by C. Morgan Babst about Hurricane Katrina and the complicated history of New Orleans. If your group is looking for a change from discussing "literary fiction," then how about mixing things up with a thriller? We recommend Alice Feeney's Sometimes I Lie about a woman paralyzed in a hospital with no idea how or why she got there, and Rhiannon Navin's Only Child about a six year-old boy ... [More]

How the Renaissance Shaped Liberal Arts Education

 

At BookBrowse, we believe that books are not an end in themselves but a jumping off point to new avenues of thought and discovery. This is why, every time we review one we also explore a related topic. Here is one such "beyond the book" article by Rose Rankin, originally titled "The Education Revolution" and written in conjunction with her review of Walter Isaacson's Leonardo da Vinci: The term "Renaissance man" means a polymath, or someone who excels at many fields. Few people earned that moniker as brilliantly as Leonardo da Vinci, who actually lived during the height of the Italian Renaissance. Making his accomplishments even more remarkable is the fact that he didn't receive much in the way of a formal education. Leonardo was rightfu... [More]

Reader Reviews You Can Trust

 

Today, we look back on the incredible selection of books our members have reviewed for our early-reader program, First Impressions during 2018 - 39 titles in total. Reader reviews abound on the web, but it's difficult to know which to trust, especially when there are businesses who will arrange for glowing reviews to be posted for a fee, and other reviews may be written by family and friends. BookBrowse's First Impressions program offers you a source of trustworthy reader reviews because only BookBrowse members can post reviews. Members indicate which books they're interested in but cannot prioritize, and copies are assigned by BookBrowse's algorithms. So, while it's conceivable that somebody connected to the book might be assig... [More]

The 2018 BookBrowse Award Winners

 

Dear BookBrowsers It's that best of time again! The time when we stand still for a minute, turn back around and take a look at what has unfolded over the course of the year. It feels like the blink of an eye, doesn't it? From January until now? Don't you wish you could somehow slow it down?There's a theory about time passing called the perceptual theory of time which offers that it seems to speed up as we get older because we continually evolve our perception of the world. Specifically (according to psychologist Robert Ornstein), our sense of the speed of time is determined by how much information our minds are absorbing. The more we take in, the slower time seems to pass. This is why children tend to sigh and exclaim Aren't we there YET? ... [More]

A Look Back on BookBrowse's 2018 Book Club Books

 

There's really no better way to be sure that a book is right for your book club than being a "fly on the wall" at an actual discussion--such as for the fifteen books we discussed in BookBrowse's Book Club during 2018.

What sets our Book Club apart from other online forums is the quality of the discussion. Participants, mostly BookBrowse members, come together with the intent of sharing and learning from each other's views just as they would if they were physically in the same room.

To help you decide which books are right for you and your book club, you can read more about the books and "listen in" to the discussions from our book club discussion page. [More]

Cover Reveal: MAYBE HE JUST LIKES YOU by Barbara Dee

 

How do you write a book about sexual harassment without any sexual content? This was my challenge in writing MAYBE HE JUST LIKES YOU. Ever since the #MeToo movement got rolling last year, I knew I wanted to write a middle grade novel about the “boys-will-be-boys” behavior which, if unchecked, eventually leads to the kind […]

How Twitter Changed My Life by Nicole Mancini

 

Teaching was a lot different when I first started 16 years ago. Overhead projectors and Vis-a-Vis markers were all the rage. Books on CD were considered “high tech.” Most classrooms had just a handful of desktop PCs (and figuring out how to get the best use of them was a constant headache). Pinterest wasn’t even […]

What Happened to My Reader? by Sarah FitzHenry and Jared Passmore

 

“What happened to my reader? Last year, he was in the library every week picking out books. I had to take his book away at meals. Now, I can’t get him to read anything. It’s like he has no interest in it.” This mystery baffles parents, librarians, and teachers alike. As students pass through middle […]

Rethinking “Just Right”: Reader and Text Variables that Impact Comprehension by Jennifer Serravallo

 

Seven years ago when I was home on maternity leave, I found it really hard to get through the sorts of rich novels I’d devoured pre-baby. Sleep deprived, I struggled with remembering everything that had happened across the text and started abandoning books halfway through. Then, a friend handed me Nora Ephron’s I Feel Bad […]

Fact VS Fiction: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills In the Age of Fake News by Jennifer LaGarde and Darren Hudgins

 

  Let’s start by making one thing clear: writing Fact VS Fiction: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills In the Age of Fake News was not a labor of love. Don’t get us wrong, we loved working together. We loved our research driven writing process. We loved our editorial team. And we loved being able to share […]

LOUISIANA’S WAY HOME by Kate DiCamillo – REVIEW BY DANA EDWARDS

 

Louisiana’s Way Home Kate DiCamillo Publisher: Candlewick Press Format: Hardcover Pages: 227 Age Range: 9-12   Three semis drove past us. One was painted with a picture of a cow standing in a field of green grass. I was jealous of that cow because she was at home and I was not.             It seemed […]

BECOMING A WRITER WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF FAMILY, CULTURE, READING, AND AN AVOCADO by Susan Kuklin

 

My grandfather, who we all called Pop, was a Russian immigrant. He was the kind of person who couldn’t bear knowing that people were being mistreated, especially because of their race, ethnicity, or beliefs. He believed strongly that “all men are created equal,” and he was grateful that his adopted country provided him with a […]

My Mirror is Cracked by Jodi-Beth Moreno

 

Growing up an avid reader, I never saw my race, my culture, or myself in books. I didn’t notice or question it. It didn’t even bother me because that is just the way books were. In all honesty, that is the way my world was. I grew up in an area that is approximately ninety-five […]

SO NOT MARY POPPINS! by Margo Sorenson

 

The world of children is abuzz! Disney says its new Mary Poppins movie released in December will be truer to the books than the original movie in 1964, starring Dick Van Dyke and Julie Andrews. Ah! Truer to the books—what a wonderful concept! Reading the Mary Poppins series aloud to children who have seen only […]

Ten Ways Reading New and Diverse Literature Changes Us as Teachers By Stephanie Affinito and Kris McGee

 

Today’s diverse classrooms demand teachers who understand the power reading holds to change students’ lives and the world around them. Our students deserve books that have characters and lives similar to their own. They also deserve books that help them think outside of themselves and provide windows into new cultures, ways of thinking or new […]

 

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